Thursday, 11 June 2020

Smaller Habs for Humble Folk

In my two posts I've covered the making of some habs from old Necromunda bulkheads, and this post covers more of the same. This time I've made a pair of small habs with some street accessories, and I've made a small foray into a flexible layout.

The thoroughfares of Necromunda are often bustling and lively.

This new pair of habs are made from a simple small box constructed from four Necromunda bulkheads with plasticard roofs and detailed with styrene strip.


I made a closed bulkhead door with more pieces of styrene.

The hanging cage is a cheap jewellery pendent. I actually sawed off the top and inserted an ork squig as a pet, but you can barely see it on the finished hab, so that was probably wasted effort!

I painted this pair in the same style as the previous habs - a dirty and rusty grey with some yellow detailing (remember I'm using yellow to denote residential structures).



But what about the flexible configuration? This pair of habs is designed to be stacked. The hab with the shutters fits onto the hab with the cage, just like this:


The larger roof size of the lower hab means there's a balcony to the rear of the upper hab, helpfully ensuring that there are no awkward doors at first floor level. The roof design of the lower hab has a negative of the footprint for the upper, meaning they interlock a little too.


And once you start terracing the habs, you can end up with some nice street backdrops:


As well as working on more habs, I've been thinking of ways to make street scenes more interesting and to aid movement above street level. 

I've made some shades from scale model beach umbrellas and brass rod which can be suspended between buildings.



And some walkways to assist with movement:



I really need at least double the number of walkways, and some at double the length, but that can be a project for another time!

23 comments:

  1. Great work. Lots of atmosphere to these pieces.

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  2. Been really enjoying these “Habs” posts. Your vision for this dirty future is something I always wanted to create myself but never had time or resources.

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    1. Thanks Dai! It probably doesn't help, but I've been mulling this kind of terrain over for several decades, and I'm only now getting to it!!

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  3. Really cool! I've been trying to work out a medium-level street scenery like your umbrellas too. Where did you get them from, by the way?

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    1. Thanks Toby! I reckon getting a bit of height and variation in levels across the scene all helps.

      The umbrellas were from Ebay - they're 27mm diameter scale model pieces. I guess they're for seaside sciences for model railways or similar :)

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  4. Shades from what? Dripping from a level up?

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    1. Acid rain precipitating from vented waste gasses, harsh irradiated light emitted from ancient reactors, or possibly just functionless decoration made to an eons-old tradition? :)

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  5. Wow. I'm obviously in love with this. You are quite quickly assembling a whole district! The shades idea is pure genius; I'm struggling to find similar solutions for my own stuff, trying not to hamper playability. I think you gave me some ideas, your work is highly inspirational!

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    1. Thanks Suber! There's a huge amount of cross-pollination with these kinds of projects. I keep looking to yours for inspiration too!!

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  6. Oh, very well done! It's great seeing the WIP shots and explanations. Jewlery supplies are always a great source of inspiration, and the umbrellas are a fantastic touch! You've about got me to the point of doing something permanent with my own Necrumunda bulkheads. I've resisted it so far because I do like the flexibility, but they need paint and help. I love what you've done to them. Fantastic!

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    1. Thanks! I had a stack of these that I'd had sitting unused for ages 'just in case'. Building these has motivated me to buy more, but more importantly, has resulted in some scenery that I will actually use. I reckon it's worth having a play with them!

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  7. These look great Jon! I like how you've made them so that they can interlock. I've got a bunch of those old bulkheads myself. Think I'll be shamelessly stealing this idea for future builds.

    Oh, and the colour scheming to distinguish different uses it's a good idea as well.....stolen :)

    Awesome!

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    1. Thanks Shane! If I'd been cleverer, I'd have made all of them stackable and interlocking. But I didn't, so I've only done it with a couple! It's probably enough for a bit of variety though.

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  8. More terrain goodness ... and the umbrellas are a great touch!

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    1. Thanks! I could do with more of the umbrellas really :)

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  9. Those look fantastic. I have just been donated a bow of these old bulk heads and will certainly be

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    1. Brilliant! Bet you can't wait to get started!

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  10. More great stuff and down at heel rather than grim dark which is cool. Love the umbrella thing.

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    1. I think there's room for all sorts of cultures in the 41st Millennium. Plenty of scope for festivity and decoration :)

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