Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Ash Wastes Salvage Vehicle - The Build

When you mention to a friend that you are looking for parts to make civilian vehicles, and the friend gives you one of these...:
 

...the only correct thing to do is to knuckle down and make a civilian vehicle out of it. If you don't recognise the nice big chunk of resin above, it's the chassis from the Forgeworld Solar Auxilia Dracosan Armoured Transport. Which usually looks like this:


I decided I was going to turn my chassis into a civilian salvage vehicle - some kind of over-sized, multi-wheeled, ash wastes version of the AA. My first step was to create some sides to the chassis in order to attach some wheels to.
 
A pair of sides cut from thick plasticard, shaped to fit in the voids where the tracks should be.

After some trimming and test fitting, my sides looked good. I now turned my attention to the wheels - in this case I used 8 large Lego wheels, and glued some 30mm round based to the open ends.

Large wheels for my salvage vehicle.

Step 3 was to assemble my various parts I glued the sides to the chassis, adding an internal bracer for strength. Then I simply glued four of my wheels on either side.

Starting to look promising.

I forgot to take photographs of the next steps in the build, but basically they were:

  • Fill in the blank spaces on the sides with some gubbins (primarily plastic Ork and Tau weapon parts I think).
  • Liberate a boom arm from a toy tele-handler.
  • Add gubbins to the boom arm (more plastic pieces and some wire cable).
  • Add a heavy stubber to the side of the cab (it is the 41st Millennium after all).

And this is pretty much where things are up to currently:




I'm going to attempt to paint the curved space where the Dracosan usually has a weapon as a windscreen.

The boom arm is removable for storage.

Hopefully I'll get some paint on it in the near future!

18 comments:

  1. It's a fantastic build really, I'm in love.

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  2. Looks Ace Jon! Is there nothing that LEGO can't be used for?! It's the toy that never stops giving :)

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    1. Agreed. Lego is the best toy. No contest!

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  3. Looking good! Could you add a bit more gubbins behind the wheels, it looks a little sparse there?

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    1. Its a good point, I'll see what I can try and squeeze in.

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  4. Great shape for a industrial vehicle. Some sort of dangerous environment maintenance vehicle? Heavily weathered industrial yellow would be an obvious way to paint it.

    I see that you are going to paint the spot where the lascannon normally mounts as a window. Might be interesting to have a small servo arm there. (or two even smaller, like spider palps, or waldos)

    Also you have friends with spare dracosan hulls, and unreleased sprues? Clearly I need better friends...

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    1. I'd already planned yellow - its the only option, right?!

      The servo arms are a great idea. I'll see what I can track down.

      As to the friends, I'm fortunate, I know!

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    2. I seem to recall that the plastic Epic Ork vehicles had something that might work. A bit obscure I know! The one on the dunestalker is probably easier to source.

      Blue grey and a light flat green could also work.

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  5. What a friend! Great work on this.

    I too would say that a manipulator arm would be better than a windscreen. Using think the windscreen would.look right when the rest of the cockpit is fully armoured.

    Looking forward to seeing this painted ;)

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    1. Would not look right.

      Stupid phone (and fat fingers).

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  6. Very promising Axiom, I have no doubt that it will be lush when painted.

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  7. That's absolutely amazing. The way you envisioned this and how it's turning out is pure genius. I'm in awe!

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    1. You're too kind! It was just a bit of playing about with some pieces to make a pleasing whole. I bought the wheels for a different project (which hasn't happened), so I was pleased to be able to use them!

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  8. That's going to be a nice piece of work right there. And it's always pleasant to finally find a good use for a neglected but interesting bit. Well done! Looking forward to seeing it in paint.

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